Giving Games

Giving Games, created by The Life You Can Save’s COO, Jon Behar, is a form of effective, affordable philanthropy education designed to teach people about effective charitable giving. The program has been used in 20 countries, primarily in classes or clubs on university campuses but also in other education settings as well as by businesses, churches, etc. It employs “experiential philanthropy”: participants learn by giving away real money (usually provided by the presenting organization) to real charities after hearing short presentations and joining in group discussions about the merits of different non-profit organizations.


Giving Game Debates with Greek Societies
McGill University's Effective Altruism group runs lively Giving Game Debates with fraternities and sororities--and lives to tell the tale (and share their insights).
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The Giving Game Project’s Vision and Strategic Plan
The Giving Game Project has an ambitious goal: we want to provide philanthropy education at a scale that will fundamentally shift the way people learn about, and practice, charitable giving. Why do we think we can achieve this goal, and how are we going to do it?
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A Shift in Priorities at the Giving Game Project
The Giving Game Project has updated priorities, placing less emphasis on growth and more on finding sustainable funding for the next stage of our development, improving the way we followup with participants after a GG, and providing measurable results of the project’s efficacy.

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Meaning at Work: Conference Report
Every November, people from around the UK and Europe congregate in the small seaside city of Brighton, on the south coast of England, for a business conference. However, this is a business conference with a difference. Styled as a gathering for peop...
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A Request from The Giving Game Project
You can multiply the impact of your giving by supporting the Giving Game Fund. By sponsoring Giving Games, you can help participants learn by giving. You’ll still be able to help great charities, but you’ll get added leverage by influencing participants to give better and supporting the outreach efforts of effective giving advocates worldwide.
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Promoting Effective Giving at Conferences via Speed Giving Games
Conferences provide an impactful opportunity to promote effective giving. This is the broad take-away from an experiment promoting effective giving at two conferences in recent months: the Unitarian Universalist (UU) General Assembly and the Secular Student Alliance (SSA) National Convention. This was an experiment run by Intentional Insights (InIn), a meta-charity devoted to promoting effective giving and rational thinking to a broad audience, with sponsorship from The Life You Can Save. This article will aim both to describe our experiences at the UU and SSA conferences, and serve as a guide to others who want to promote effective giving via conferences.
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The Giving Game Project's Annual Report
With another school year in the books, it's time to take stock here at The Giving Game Project. This report reflects back on our progress over the last year, where we stand relative to our long-term goals, and our plans for the future.
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How I celebrated the holidays with a Giving Game
A Giving Game is a great approach to sharing this side of your life in a non-confrontational way with people to whom you are close. It lets you be a co-participant with everyone in exploring effective giving, rather than the know-it-all with the answers.
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Tapping Skeptic Hearts Through Giving Games
“If others have half the experience I had today, they will be completely changed.” That’s what a participant told me after the end of a Giving Game I facilitated that aimed to engage people’s emotions in making a decision about where to donate.
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How to run a Giving Game and start a local chapter
By Michael Dello-Iacovo

I was recently involved with running a Giving Game in Adelaide to help kick start a new local chapter in Australia. We introduced the concepts of effective altruism and discussed why it is important to consider the effectiveness of charities. We then summarized the work of two highly effective Australian charities, The Fred Hollows Foundation and Oxfam Australia. After dividing the audience into small groups to discuss which charity they thought was most effective, we held a vote to determine the winner. The Life You Can Save had agreed to donate $10 per attendee to the winning charity to give people incentive to think critically.
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